Moving Company Advice on Safest Way to Move Commercial Kitchen Equipment

When you are relocating or starting a new restaurant business, you’ll probably have to transport your kitchen equipment. Because many of the units used in a commercial kitchen are big and bulky with a lot of sharp or delicate parts, they are usually difficult to move and potentially dangerous. Aside from the difficulty and potential danger, you’d not want to cause any property or equipment damage in the process.

Transporting Kitchen Equipment

The fact that soul food restaurants usually have several kitchen appliances makes moving a much bigger undertaking. As such, hiring professional movers (like Apple Moving – applemoving.com/woodbridge-movers) who specialize in moving restaurant equipment might be the best course of action. Letting a licensed and insured professional handle the move helps to reduce the potential danger. But if you decide to go this route, you’ll want to ask about policies and get a few quotes. In this way, determining the best company to hire is a lot easier.

However, you can always complete the task yourself, especially if you have enough workforce. If you decide not to engage professional services, you’ll want to keep the following in mind.

1. Properly Disconnect

Before any move, make sure you disconnect all your kitchen appliances properly. Because you would otherwise run the risk of electrical shock, scalds from hot food or liquid spills, radiation, burns, machine blockage, and fire, proper disconnection is arguably the most important safety measure when moving restaurant equipment.

Once disconnected, you should allow enough time for the equipment to cool down and reach room temperature. Remember, thawing your freezers is just as important as allowing your cooking equipment to cool down completely.

It goes without saying that you should not transport any of your kitchen appliances with food in them. Food left inside a disconnected equipment is likely to spoil, and this could result in a potentially huge mess.

2. Clean and Pack

Before the move, you must clean each piece of equipment thoroughly. In addition to removing all your shelves and trays, you’ll want to be sure you’ve packed them separately. For instance, you must remove all of the internal metal racks from your ovens and all the utensil racks from your dishwashers. If you fail to detach or remove these items, they can shake around, become damaged or adversely impact the unit’s functionality.

Pay special attention when packing small kitchen appliances. Wrap sharp objects such grinders and knives with care, and make sure you label each package appropriately. For blenders and mixers, deconstruct any that have multiple, movable parts and wrap each carefully.

3. Shrink-Wrap Before Transport

Before you move your kitchen appliances into a moving truck, make sure you have them shrink-wrapped with plastic moving wrap. Apart from keeping all the drawers and doors from opening, shrink wrapping helps to protect the exterior surface against scrapes and prevents dust and debris from penetrating through the featured gaps.

4. Lift Carefully

When moving large appliances, you’ll want to lift with care. Even if you have people assisting, use of specialized tools like forearm lifting straps and dollies might make the load a lot more tolerable. Make sure everyone involved lifts with their legs and not with their backs. Lifting with your back is known to cause back injuries.

Best Soul Food Restaurants in the Deep South

Soul food — traditional Southern comfort food with an African-American emphasis—takes you back to those simpler days when Grandma spent hours in the kitchen and lovingly cooked everything from scratch. The South is full of soul food restaurants, but here are some of the best.

Shirley’s Sole Food Café in Toccoa, Georgia

Walking in, you will see Shirley herself smiling at you from behind the register, probably because she knows she’s got the best food in Toccoa.

She opened in 2000 and has been cooking up mouth-watering fried chicken, pork chops, collards, crackling cornbread, and cobbler ever since. With gospel music in the background, the only thing you’ll have to worry about is which meat and three sides to choose. Luckily, everything is delicious. The most amazing thing about this place? When the doors close at 2 pm, Shirley welcomes the homeless inside to feast on leftover food.

Shirley’s Sole Food Café is located at 124 W. Currahee Street

(706) 297-7739

Shirley's Sole Food Cafe

Jestine’s Kitchen in Charleston, South Carolina

Located on the corner of Meeting and Wentworth Streets, you’ll recognize Jestine’s Kitchen by the long line of people waiting outside. It’s named for Jestine Matthews, born in 1885 in South Carolina’s low country, daughter of a freed slave. Her authentic Southern recipes are what sets this restaurant apart.

Do yourself a favor and order the fried chicken. You’ll be jealous of everyone who’s got a plate of it, and you don’t. And you can’t forget about those yummy sides. Their mac and cheese, collards, and green beans are the soul food of gold standard.

On your second trip, try the fried pork chop, meatloaf or shrimp, and grits.

Jestine’s Kitchen is located at 251 Meeting Street

(843) 722-7224

Jestine's Kitchen

Eagles Restaurant in Birmingham, Alabama

This unassuming, family-owned restaurant has been a community fixture since 1951. If you crave oxtail that falls right off the bone, tender neck bones, or succulent pig’s feet and ears— you’re in the right place. And that chicken and dressing? To die for.

But don’t forget the veggies—stewed okra and tomatoes, fried corn and black eyed peas—home cooked and fresh as can be, all straight from the local farmer’s market.

The menu changes daily, so check online to see what’s in store.

Eagles Restaurant is located 2610 16th St N

(205) 320-0099

Eagle's Restaurant

Bully’s Restaurant in Jackson, Mississippi

Since the 1980’s, the Bully family has owned and operated this forty-seat, James Beard award-winning local treasure. Each day, they serve hundreds of hungry customers with authentic soul food recipes proudly handed down from previous generations.

You can’t beat the lunch plates—meat and two sides for $6.50 is nothing but a steal. Slow-cooked smoked meats, steaming fried catfish, smothered oxtails, spicy collard greens, fried green tomatoes—and that’s just the beginning. As hard as it is, you’ll have to save room for that delectable blackberry cobbler.

Bully’s Restaurant is located at 3118 Livingston Rd

(601) 362-0484

Bully's Restaurant

9 Staples of Every Soul Food Menu

Soul food is some of the tastiest food on the planet, and most soul food restaurants include similar staples for an authentic menu. The go-to meat is usually fried chicken, and your chances of making it right at home are slim. Here are nine items that are on most menus across the soul food spectrum.

1. Meat – Chicken, Beef, and Pork

The meat was not always a staple of soul food diets, but now you’ll find it has a prominent place on most soul food menus. Some options include:

• Fried chicken: which might be called “Southern, deep fried or just cooked.”
• Beef: meatloaf, liver and onions and stew may be in this category
• Pork: Pigs’ feet that may be barbecued or boiled, chitterlings, neck bones, pork chops

Chitterlings are pronounced “chitlins.” And yes, pickled pigs’ feet are a real thing.

2. Catfish

Catfish is the first fish choice any soul food menu and is commonly featured on the menu of Southern food subscription service PeachDish. It is usually pan fried, but it could be blackened or baked, too. You haven’t lived until you’ve had pan-fried catfish. Coastal areas might include grilled shrimp and salmon patties on their menus. A seafood boil may consist of:

• Shrimp
• Smoked sausage
• Snow crab legs
• Sweet corn on the cob
• Red potatoes

Local, fresh catfish is often available on soul food menus. Anything fresh and local is worth a try.

When eaten raw collard greens are tough and bitter, but when boiled and simmered Southern-style, these greens are delicious!

When eaten raw collard greens are tough and bitter, but when boiled and simmered Southern-style, these greens are delicious!

3. Collard Greens

It might not be a real soul food restaurant if it doesn’t have collard greens on the menu. Greens may not entice you while they’re cooking, but when they’re ready to eat, you’re in for a treat. Collard greens need to be cooked with meat to be edible, particularly ham hocks. Bacon is another favorite for adding flavor. Many add crushed red pepper, salt, and pepper before cooking the daylights out of them. They are typically boiled and then simmer for about a half hour.

4. Mac ‘n’ Cheese

This dish does not need much variation, ever. Basic macaroni pasta and mild cheddar cheese are the key ingredients. Making it “fancy” ruins the whole soul food vibe.

5. Black-Eyed Peas

Named for the black spot that dots this flesh-colored legume, black-eyed peas have long graced Southern dinner tables. Like collard greens, these peas cooked with a pork product along with onion and hot sauce for additional flavor. When eaten on New Year’s Day, these are thought to bring good luck.

6. Cornbread

Made from cornmeal, flour, and ample amounts of butter and sugar, cornbread is an excellent Southern take on traditional bread. Original recipes were handed down from the Native Americans who had been using ground corn in their cooking for centuries. Early European settlers to the Southern U.S. quickly adapted these recipes to their liking, creating a delicious meal accompaniment that we still enjoy today.

7. Candied Yams

As Southern cooking goes – anything is delicious when smothered in butter and sugar. Candied yams are no exception. These delightful treats start with diced sweet potatoes that cook in butter, then are coated with sugar and spices and simmered over a low heat until tender.

Lemon meringue pie is a common dessert found at the end of a soul food buffet line.

Lemon meringue pie is a common dessert found at the end of a soul food buffet line.

8. Desserts

Desserts are the climax of a soul food menu. Many menus include a big favorite down south: banana pudding topped vanilla wafers and whipped cream. Fresh fruit pie with ice cream and coconut cake are popular. Bread pudding and lemon meringue pie are also frequently listed in the dessert section. Fruit cobbler is a big hit, especially with vanilla ice cream.

9. Sweet Tea

Now, iced tea is a drink, but it’s a must. For a real soul food menu, there should be sweet tea. Some diners prefer unsweetened tea, and they’re called Yankees.

Another aspect of soul food menus is the “smothered” possibility. This means gravy covers whatever meat is ordered, and usually rice accompanies it. It’s hard to go wrong with gravy. Enjoy the eating.